Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Submit Your Ideas and Suggestions, Please!

When I started writing this OSHA Training Blog a few years ago, my mind was full of ideas for things to write about; that was 60 posts ago.  Now I am starting to run out of good ideas for things to write about (tells you a little something about the capacity of my brain, huh?).

Do you have an idea or suggestion for a topic to cover in this blog?  Obviously, it needs to be OSHA related. Also, the topic should not be too specific in scope - like Nevada OSHA rules for using left-handed monkey wrenches in underground tunnels . . .  Just submit your suggestion (and any comments you want) in the "COMMENTS" section below.

While we are at it, I am also soliciting suggestions for future OSHA training toolbox talks that we post free every month. The last one for 2015 finishes up our series on Lockout/Tagout, and I will need a new topic to focus on for the next 6 to 12 talks starting January 1, 2016.  So please, add you suggestions for toolbox talks in the COMMENTS section below, too.

Let me close by saying "Thank You" to everyone who reads the blog, and especially those who send emails and post comments. You make me feel creating these resources is worth the effort.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!!!

Curtis Chambers

18 comments:

  1. Thank you, Curtis, for your efforts and sharing. "inspiration" for training topics commonly come to me based on where or how the folks I support choose to get hurt or have Near Hit events. Perhaps the OSHA Top 10 Violations listing is a broad scale equivalent. Or the BLS statistics on work-related fatalities & injuries. The Darwin Awards mocking of creative ways some un/under-informed folks have chosen to take themselves out of the humankind gene pool can be entertaining, if in a 'dark humor' sort of way. And lend themselves to good investigatory processes when the mood gets more serious. Topics that seem to have staying power may include vehicle driver performance and training or education, evolving safety management systems (OSHA, ISO 45000, ANSI Z10, BSI, etc), and basic human attitude-behavior and the outcomes they generate. Gotta be geared to your audience, of course.
    Best Regards,
    Tim

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  2. How about hard to find stuff...or OSHA myths?
    Where do I find the requirement to anchor pallet racking?
    Is there a requirement for self closing doors on Flam Cabinets?

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  3. Regarding general industry, is the machinery owner responsible, under the OSHA guidelines, for the safety of a temporary worker?

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  4. Curtis - I always enjoy reading your posts & appreciate the time you devote to them. A timely topic is OSHA's initiative on electronic recordkeeping and if they can push it through in December for a January rollout. My initial thought was they didn't have enough time and if they missed a January rollout it would have to wait until 2017 but it looks like they are pushing hard for the 2016 start date. In my opinion this initiative will have a significant impact on large multi-location companies as some locations could/will have high rates that could trigger inspection activiity. Would be great if you could track and comment on this. Thanks!

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  5. I'm always interested in others' professional insights on supervisor training (i.e., training to supervise), measuring safety performance, meaningful variations of I2P2's, incentive programs, and advancing a constructive safety culture. Thanks!

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  6. I'm submitting a few ideas without reviewing all of your past topics so simply strike anything you've already addressed: Elements of written plans (e.g. EAP, FPP, ECP), challenges of 'operator-up' style forklifts, and fixed indoor (e.g. bridge, jib) cranes. Thanks for taking suggestions.
    Ken W.

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  7. Thanks for your blog Curtis. I would love to see more discussion about the following: 1) Why OSHA has been ineffective at promulgating new rules. 2) Why OSHA has not updated the woefully inadequate PELs. 3) Why companies cannot depend on OSHA for a safe workplace. That minimum OSHA compliance does not necessarily equate to safe and healthy employees. Why they should look to Best In Class standards. 4) How an ergonomics program can transform safety at many workplaces and yet there are no rules around strains and sprains or cumulative trauma hazards. 5) Why the OSHA incident rate is such an ambiguous metric for companies to track safety and other suggestions for tracking that are more leading indicators. 6) What types of things can be credited for the huge decline in workplace accidents and fatalities in America over the last 100 years. Workers' Comp, Safety Pros, Unions, OSHA? 7) How a risk management approach can raise the bar on safety performance. 8) Can frontline supervision really make the difference to keep people safe? How can companies strengthen this safety accountability system? 9) Explain the movement away from traditional BBS programs into new less controversial such as recognizing employees and safety interactions. I've seen a movement away from BBS and into more positive types of "Catching" people when doing it right. These are just a few things off the top of my head. If you have already discussed them and I missed it, forgive me, but otherwise, have fun! Mike

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  8. OSHA's "Rapid Response" procedures for responding to an "immediate report" accident.

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  9. My suggestion has to with Temporary workers also... not so much with who is responsible, but what out of the box measures can be utilized to convince employers that the costs of not protecting them are far greater than the cost of trying to assure they don't get hurt.

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  10. Curtis: I'm curios about conflict between regulations. Example: DOT says truck drivers have to be able to speak and understand English. OSHA says employers must train employees in a language that they understand ???
    Ed Thompson

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  11. Your blog was forwarded to me by David Barr, CSP.
    Anyway, I am a Safety Trainer and would be interested in ideas from you or any of your followers on things you have done to make some of these important--but potentially-dry--OSHA topics more enjoyable for the students in my classes.

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    1. I agree! I've designed a Myth Busters approach to PPE training (smashing a non steel toe boot with a banana in it, dropping a hammer on a watermelon with an inadequate hard hat on, etc.) I'd like to be able to add something to every training to keep employees attention.

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  12. I would like to hear your thoughts on OSHA's retraction of PSM letters of interpretation an what the statements mean, in particular what it means for determining PSM boundaries.

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  13. Here's a fun one for construction: some of the industry has awakened to the concept of providing blocking under the crawlers/outriggers to reduce ground bearing pressure to below the bearing capacity of the ground - but 100' away a concrete pump will set up with 2'x2' pads under an outrigger with a 60k load. People look at me funny and say it's a concrete pump truck, not a crane... I'm the Village Idiot in my company because I care - but if someone else says it, it must be right! (I'm sure others know what I'm saying)

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  14. I really enjoy and learn from your blogs. How about a blog topic on barricading work area. - Mike @ SRS

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  15. Hi Curtis, Thank you for your informative blogs. Perhaps you could devote some space to clarifying when FED OSHA regulations apply and when CAL OSHA regulations are to be followed. A good portion of our work is performed over water: pile-driving, pier construction/repair, bridge work, etc., so on many job sites we switch back and forth between the two sets of regulations.

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    1. Actually addressed this situation in a blog post in June of 2012 - here is the link: http://oshatrainingservices.blogspot.com/2012/06/where-federal-osha-or-other-agency.html

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  16. Excellent and very effective article.Thank you so much for your thought sharing with us.

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